Montana Trout Unlimited offers reward for illegal fish planting

Montana Trout Unlimited and its Flathead Valley Chapter are doubling their previous reward offer for apprehension and conviction of the persons responsible for illegally planting walleyes in Swan Lake and Noxon Reservoir, as well smallmouth bass in Seeley Lake. The reward is now $20,000. This is in addition to reward money that might be available from elsewhere, including the Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks (FWP) offer of $1,000 through its TIPMONT program, and another estimated $4,000 offered by a collection of sportsmen's groups.

Fishing is fantastic on Flathead Lake

In my 68 years on planet earth I’ve never had an awareness of how good fishing could be in Polson Bay on Flathead Lake. A summer combination of high temperatures, more weed growth, knowledge of where the fish are and a spike in the new burgeoning population of small mouth bass added together equaled spectacular fishing. From my boat alone we harvested hundreds of perch probable y20 limits of smalleys. As recently as last Monday, October 26th, Marlon Starblanket and I brought home 60 fillet sized perch one of which was a jumbo 12 incher. (See picture)

Avalanche workshop in Bozeman Nov. 11

Montana State University will host an all-day snow and avalanche workshop aimed at MSU students, the Bozeman ski and snowmobile community and regional avalanche professionals. The free event – 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. on Wednesday, Nov. 11, in the Strand Union Building’s Ballroom A – will focus on decision-making and evaluating risk on local terrain.

Bringing back the old ways of kayaking

Ed Hopkins bobbed in the cool evening water of Flathead Lake Tuesday night.
Sitting in his kayak he tucked his narrow wooden paddle under his arm and extended it like a long wing. He adjusted his nose plugs and flipped over in his kayak. Only the bottom of his boat was visible atop the water; then with a swoosh, his upper body emerged and he was quickly upright, using the Scandinavian style of kayak rolling.

Montana hunters help feed the hungry in Montana

Montana hunters can help feed the hungry in Montana.
The Montana Food Bank Network is preparing for an increase in the amount of game donations as awareness increases this year. In partnership with Montana Fish, Wildlife, & Parks, hunters in Montana are being informed of the option of donating their big game. Hunters who legally harvested big game during the hunting season are able to donate the meat to help Montanans in need at no cost to the hunter.

On the Edge: Coyotes survive, thrive despite development

By Jan Wassink
Coyotes prey on small mammals and birds and are excellent scavengers. Their populations are booming despite encroaching human development. "They are very adaptable. They can live anywhere, do anything," says Jamie Jonkel, a wildlife biologist who has studied wolves, coyotes, mountain lions, bears and other predators. "They're a real generalist." Jonkel.

Hiawatha’s Trail — biking the Tunnels on Lolo Pass

By Dave Reese
Montana Living
The wet concrete walls seeped with water and filled the ruts in the dirt road as we rode our bicycles quietly through the old railroad tunnel. Our headlamps shot narrow beams of light through the long, dark tunnel, through a blackness so intense that by shutting off your light you were immediately engulfed in utter darkness.

Exploring the Yellowstone River

Call it 670 miles or perhaps more precisely 674 miles, but either way, the Yellowstone River remains the nation's longest undammed waterway. It’s a great river that gathers some of the finest mountain and prairie topography on the planet as it passes peaks reaching 12,000 feet in elevation, the largest high-mountain lake on the continent, dense evergreen forests, buttes, colorful badlands, deep canyons and sweet-smelling sage and juniper covered hills. A good portion of this wondrous river flows in Wyoming, but Montana claims most of it and gives it a home.

Mack Days tournament forges lifelong friendship for Mike Benson, Jason Mahlen

Fishing has a way of making friends.
For Mike Benson and Jason Mahlen, fishing forged a lifelong friendship.
Benson recalls the day perfectly. It was one of those blue bird spring days on Flathead Lake; the sun was out, and fishermen were fishing in t-shirts and shorts. Then he heard a strange noise.

They Come out at Night: grooming Big Mountain

The nocturnal beasts emerge from their dens at sundown, just when the last skiers are making their way down Big Mountain.
Following a path of light thrown out ahead of them, the groomers crawl slowly through the trails and trees, leaving perfect seams of corduroy.

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